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PTSD On Military Wives: They Experience It Too

Submitted by Meditec on Tue, 03/20/2018 - 17:55
PTSD On Military Wives: They Experience It Too

PTSD or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder claims by veterans are rising each year. The main concern is that most of them do not discuss their symptoms due to the fear of being ostracized in their personal and professional lives. However, wives of military veterans and those on active duty are also at risk of acquiring PTSD due to prolonged exposure to their struggling partners. Most of them refrain from discussing their own symptoms for the same reason their spouses refuse to discuss theirs. MyCAA Programs for Military Spouses Anyone who is married to someone in the armed forces is serving their country as well. Even though they don’t wear the uniform or support their troops on the front, they are constantly fighting a personal battle at home. The loneliness after the departure of a deployed spouse can be soul-crushing, but it is what military spouses experience after their partner returns that can be debilitating. What is Secondary Post Traumatic Disorder (SPTSD)? SPTSD, or Secondary Post Traumatic Disorder refers to the manifestation of PTSD symptoms in a person who is indirectly exposed to a traumatic situation. In military spouses, the stress comes from dealing with their partner’s traumatic experience in the army, and the adverse reactions that result from it. Also known as compassion fatigue or burnout, SPTSD can manifest from physical abuse, verbal abuse or any traumatic incident. It affects caregivers (in this case, military spouses) by making them hyper vigilant when it comes to their battle-weary spouse. They start avoiding places and situations that they think might trigger a violent flashback or set off their spouse in any way. Since they realize that the result is usually beatings or verbal abuse, most military spouses isolate themselves and their partner from society as a form of self-preservation.  In other words, the spouse starts to display classic signs of PTSD through secondary exposure. They never know when their loved one may explode in anger or have a panic attack. Military personnel may be home physically, but their minds refuse to leave the battlefield. The traumas of war often follow them back home. Spouses and children are particularly at risk since they are directly exposed to those effects. They walk on eggshells around them, being very careful not to do anything that might trigger an attack. They get yelled at for no reason and are often at the bad end of an emotional tirade through no fault of their own. Those reactions cannot be predicted accurately, making the spouse feel unloved and unwanted. Confused and bewildered by the drastic changes in personality, most spouses don’t have enough information to understand what causes the outbursts, personality changes, and the emotional detachment. The bottom line is that without proper counseling, their struggling partner doesn’t understand this either. Verbalizing their struggle is the last thing they want to do because most PTSD sufferers believe no one can understand what they are going through. Unfortunately, this only leaves their families confused and concerned especially since most PTSD sufferers refuse help. Spouses of veterans who suffer from this condition often go into depression and may also have suicidal thoughts. What is the MyCAA Program? It can be difficult to live with a military spouse who is suffering from PTSD. Besides the emotional drain, civilian spouses may suddenly find themselves as the sole breadwinners for their family as their spouses struggle to deal with their symptoms. The MyCAA or Military Spouse Career Advancement Account is designed to provide training and education to military spouses who want access to career opportunities that can help them make ends meet. The scholarship program was made to aid military spouses in tapping into high-growth careers. Eligible candidates include those who have a spouse on active duty and those who are members of the National Guard. Candidates can apply to, start, and complete the program if their military spouse is on Title 10 military orders. The certification programs can last from 6 to 9 months in a classroom setting. However, that time can be reduced significantly via online classes. Students can sign up online and take the courses according to their own schedule. So if you want to get access to career options that pay better than what you are earning or want to train yourself for a job to support your spouse and family, sign up for the course today.

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